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Writing in Science

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Science Writing Rubric
Sample Writing Prompts
Writing a Conclusion/Discussion
Writing Table and Graph Analysis
Technical Writing
Vocabulary
Writing to Learn in Science
Interactive Notebooks
Using SOLVE in Science

Standards
Additional Resources


Science Writing Rubric
Sample Writing Prompts

Unpacking the Prompt

Prewriting

Websites for Prewriting and Sharing Ideas

  • Make Belief Comix – This site allows students to build comic strips.
  • Mind Meister – This site allows students to brainstorm and could be used as a prewriting technique.
  • Wall Wisher – This site can be used to create a wall that students &/or teachers can use to post information or ideas.

General Science

Biology

 

Chemistry

Earth

Environmental

Physics

Zoology

Editing

Writing a Conclusion/Discussion

 

Writing Table and Graph Analysis
Technical Writing
Vocabulary

Prefixes and Suffixes

General

6th Grade

7th Grade

8th Grade

Anatomy

Biology

 

Chemistry

Earth

Environmental

Forensics

Horticulture

Paramedic

Physics

Zoology

Using Writing to Learn in
Science

See the Table of Contents of this teachers' guide to Writing Across the Curriculum in Science for descriptions, implementation ideas, and examples of some of these strategies for writing to learn in Science class:

  • Cause and Effect Graphic Organizer:  Have students complete a graphic organizer that explains the cause and effect relationship.
  • Column Notes:  Use a T chart to define terms or explain processes.
  • Compare and Contrast:  Use a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast.
  • Cornell NotesA format for taking notes that uses boxes. It requires students to process material as they are learning it by formulating questions, summarizing, and analyzing. Students can draw lines or simply fold notebook paper to form the blocks.
  • Vocabulary Trees:  Use vocabulary organizers to study the parts of scientific words and their positions in sentences.
  • GIST: GIST (Cunningham 1982) is a strategy designed to help students learn to write organized and concise summaries. Summaries restate only the author’s main ideas, omitting all examples and evidence used in supporting and illustrating points. For students who are at a loss as how to put a reading into their own words, GIST can be used as a step by step method.
  • Journaling (Science Notebooks) or Learning Logs:   Learning logs are different from traditional journals.  Learning logs document the learning that occurs during a class, a project, or a unit of study.  Learning logs are excellent tools for individual accountability during collaborative work.
  • Metaphorical Thinking: 
    • Direct Analogy
    • Personal Analogy
    • Simile Review
  • Quick Write/ Exit Slips: Quick Writing is a motivating pre-reading activity that prepares students for reading new material or reviewing material in preparation for understanding new information to be read.
  • Word Bank Writing:  Writing from a word bank is a strategy used from the earliest grades. Students write a paragraph utilizing words that the teacher has pre-selected.
Interactive Notebooks

8. Interactive Notebooks 

The purpose of the interactive notebook is to enable students to be creative, independent thinkers and writers. Interactive notebooks are used for class notes as well as for other activities where the student will be asked to express his/her own ideas and process the information presented in class. 

Using SOLVE in Science

S: Study the problem. ("S" the problem.) The first step is to highlight the question.
O: Organize the facts. ("O" the problem.) You must always "S" the problem first, then you may organize the facts about the problem.
L: Line up a plan. Students must "S" and "O" the problem before they "L"the problem. In this steps students need to come up with a way to solve the problem.
V: Verify your plan with action. The first step in this plan is to make an estimate of the answer.  Next the students actually do the experiment.
E: Examine the results. In this step, students will ask the questions: "Did you answer what you were asked to find in S?" "Is my answer accurate?" "Is my answer reasonable?" The last step in "E" is to write the answer as a complete sentence.

Common Core Standards

Additional Resources

 

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