Save the Bay!

Student Resources
Image accessed from SIRS Discoverer Bay Map
Teacher Resources

open

  • Invitation to inquiry
  • Open minds
  • Stimulate curiosity

trash

 

Immerse

  • Build background knowledge
  • Connect to content
  • Discover interesting ideas
Icons from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

Background Knowledge

comprehension

Research Scenario

The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the world and has become a trash can! Bottles and cans float on the tides. They drift into the streams, inlets, and along the shores of the bay. Styrofoam cups, plastic bags, and bottles tangle with bay grasses. The bay is home to thousands of aquatic species. It is a source of recreation and industry for the 5,162,430 citizens of Maryland, and we are destroying it with tons of trash thrown down storm drains, on beaches, streets and open spaces. The future of the bay and its resources are in the hands of its citizens. It is not always how much money we spend to clean-up a situation but what we do to protect the Chesapeake..

Read more about Environmental pollution.

 

Essential Question: How can you save the Chesapeake Bay and its wildlife from extinction?

 

Why We Need to Clean Up the Chesapeake Bay

The video below highlights the importance of cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay

save the bay

 

Throughout the research process, you will use a variety of inquiry tools and strategies.

First, use the resources below to build background knowledge, connect to the content, and discover interesting ideas.

  • Begin your Inquiry Journal by responding to these Inquiry Journal Prompts. Choose one prompt to complete each day.

Below are resources that will help you learn more about the Chesapeake Bay, pollution and wildlife extinction.

Explore

  • Explore interesting ideas
  • Look around
  • Dip in
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.


pencil and paper

Image Source: Accessed from clipart.com

Task and Product

As citizens of Maryland, we have been asked to join in the efforts to clean up and help keep the Bay and its shores healthy. You and your group members will research the effect debris pollution has on three specific organisms that live in or around the Chesapeake Bay and then prepare an action plan or a public affairs video that you will present to an audience.

You will gather the necessary information and complete a data chart.

It is important to learn how the members of your family or your neighbors dispose of plastics and other kinds of trash. If you are going be successful changing the habits of others, it's always a good idea to start close to home. Complete an environmental survey with your family or neighbors. Use this information to assist your work through this project.

All of these steps help you to prepare an action plan. Your teacher will assign you and a few of your classmates to work in a group for this step. You will need to learn more about working together. Here is a checklist for you and your group to use when planning your group work. Here is an organizer to help you prepare your action plan.

When you have prepared your plan, you will be ready to present your ideas to an audience using a multimedia presentation like PowerPoint, Kid Pics, or HyperStudio.

Explore

Use exploratory search strategies like browsing, scanning, and skimming a variety of resources. "Dip in" to read and reflect as you explore.

  • Use the Stop and Jot strategy to record ideas and questions in your Inquiry Journal.
  • Use the Pair-Share Protocol to clarify your ideas, get feedback, and gain insight.
  • Use the Inquiry Log to keep track of sources that might be useful for your inquiry.

evaluate

  • Evaluate the achievement of learning goals
  • Reflect on content
  • Reflect on process
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.


Image source accessed from clipart.com

hard working

Assessments

The following scoring tools may be used or adapted by you and your teacher to evaluate your research process and your final product and presentation. You can use these assessments throughout your inquiry process to plan, make decisions, monitor your progress, and self-assess your achievement of your inquiry-based learning goals.

 

Research Process Assessments:
Collaboration & Communication Assessments:
Final Product & Presentation Assessments: Combined Process/Product Assessment:

Identify

  • Pause and ponder
  • Decide direction
  • Identify inquiry question
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.


: question mark

Image source accessed from clipart.com

Questions

Overarching Question:

How could you save the Chesapeake Bay and its wildlife from extinction?

Essential Inquiry Question:

Reflect back on what you learned and see if you can answer some of the questions below. You will want to think about as you research your organism and the effects of pollution.

1. What do you know about debris pollution in the Chesapeake Bay and on its shores?

2. What do you want to know in order to improve the environment of the Chesapeake Bay for your three organisms?

3. What is your organisms habitat?

4. What threatens the organism?

5. How does the threat reach the organism?

For even more questions try these!Try using a KWL chart to help your thinking and organize information needed about debris pollution and your organism.

gather

  • Gather important information
  • Go broad (search)
  • Go deep (read)
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.


Image accessed from www.pics4learning.com

backbay

 

Gather & Sort

You will now begin your research to gather, read, sift, and sort information to present to your classmates about ways to improve the environment of the Chesapeake Bay.

Use this chart and action plan organizer to help you gather and sort your data. Gather your research from the Resources Page

Use the Destiny School Library Catalog to locate books in the library about your organism.

  • You may want to use the databases to gather additional information about your three organisms.
  • Use the organisms chart to locate information from internet sources. If you need additional information about the Chesapeake Bay and pollution use the following sources.
  • Use these Chesapeake Bay Resources to help you understand more about the Chesapeake Bay.
  • Don't forget to complete the environmental survey with your family to assist in your action plan.

Apply effective search strategies in order to locate and evaluate sources and digital content relevant to your information need.

  • Read deeply from pertinent resources and apply reading strategies to construct meaning.
  • Use the Inquiry Log to make choices and track your inquiry journey.
  • Use strategies and tools for note-taking, documentation, and reflection as you gather:
  • Refine your inquiry question or focus as needed, based on your research findings so far and your new insights and understandings.
  • Demonstrate digital citizenship and avoid plagiarism by paraphrasing or quoting information, and by citing your sources in a Works Cited list.

Create

  • Reflect on learning
  • Go beyond facts to make meaning
  • Create to communicate
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.


Image accessed from www.pics4learning.com

crab

Create

If you need more data to fill in your chart then go back and revise a question or create new questions to complete the chart.

Do you have the information to answer these questions?

  • What have you learned about Chesapeake Bay pollution and your organism?
  • What can you suggest be done to change the way you and your family dispose of trash that will not harm the bay and its wildlife?
  • How can you change the behavior of others to prevent this problem from getting worse?

Use your chart and environmental survey to help you turn your new knowledge into an action plan. You will use your pieces of research and survey information to create a whole new product to show what you have learned about the Chesapeake Bay pollution and its effects on the wildlife in and around the shores of the Chesapeake Bay. Now that's taking ACTION!

Action plan organizer

Look through your research notes to reflect on your learning. What did you learn that you didn't know before?

  • What is your organisms habitat?
  • What threatens the organism?
  • How does the threat reach the organism?
  • What do you know about debris pollution in the Chesapeake Bay and on its shores?
  • What do you want to know in order to improve the environmnet of the Chesapeake Bay for your three organisms?

Put all the things that you learned together to creating a product to communicate new meaning and understanding.

Evaluate your research product and presentation according to the scoring criteria.

What have you learned in your research to help you answer this question?

How could you save the Chesapeake Bay and its wildlife from extinction?

share

  • Learn from each other
  • Share your learning
  • Tell your story
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.


 

:

Share

Present your research findings to your inquiry community by using a multimedia presentation like Powerpoint, Kid Pics, Pixi, or Hyperstudio.

Use the chart below to help organize your notes.

Use the rubrics below to help when you are creating your presentation.

sharing
Image source
:
Accessed from clipart.com

 

evaluate

  • Evaluate the achievement of learning goals
  • Reflect on content
  • Reflect on process
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

 

Image source: Accessed from clipart.com

thinking child

Evaluate:

Getting ready for your presentation is hard work, here are some things to think about:

Decide in your group who will be responsible for

  • gathering information from all group members
  • organizing the group information into similar categories (refere to your research chart)
  • creating the storyboard
  • use of the technology
  • editing
  • checking the final product

Time to look back and reflect about what you have learned! Now that you have shared what you have learned abou thte Chesapeake Bay pollution and what might be done to keep the Chesapeake Bay healthy, write a letter to another third grader telling them how important it is for them to save the Chesapeake Bay. You may want to include some ways that you already help or plan to help clean up the Bay.

Evaluate the achievement of your inquiry-based learning goals using the scoring tools in the Assessments section, as directed by your teacher:


Extend your learning:

jQuery