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Identify

Pause and ponder
Decide direction
Identify inquiry questions

Guided Inquiry Process- Identify Open Immerse Explore Identify Gather Create Share Evaluate
Kuhlthau, Carol C., Leslie K. Maniotes, and Ann C. Caspari. 2012.
Guided Inquiry Design: A Framework for Inquiry in Your School. Libraries Unlimited.
We're now ready for a very important step. Each of us should be ready to pause and ask meaningful inquiry questions. Don't worry, we've prepared well for this phase. We spent time immersing and exploring to build background knowledge on a broad topic. Doing this gave us background knowledge. Our goal is for each of us to construct an inquiry question from the interesting ideas, pressing problems, and emerging themes we have explored in various sources of information. Your inquiry questions will zero in on a part or aspect of the larger topic that will frame the rest of your research process.

    • Select the Skills & Tools button on the left for help with this step.
    • Select a Unit tab below to begin the Identify step of your inquiry.

UNIT 1: Connecting Research

Essential Questions:

  • How do you refine and focus a topic of research?
  • How does a reader determine the validity/reliability of sources?
  • How does a reader determine the usefulness of sources?
  • How does a reader develop a position in response to new learning?
PBA: Legend/Strange Phenomenon Informational Essay
Follow an inquiry-based process to research a legend or strange phenomenon and use credible sources to develop an informational essay.

LESSON 4: Inquiry Questions by Topic:

  1. Amelia Earhart: What really happened to Amelia Earhart?
  2. Area 51: Did the U.S. government really capture a UFO and aliens at Area 51?
  3. Atlantis: Did the lost city of Atlantis really exist?
  4. Bermuda Triangle: Why have planes and boats disappeared in the Bermuda Triangle?
  5. Bigfoot (a.k.a. Sasquatch): Does the Bigfoot monster really exist?
  6. Chupacabra: Does this vampire-like creature really exist?
  7. Moai of Easter Island: How and why were the giant stone faces of the Moai created?
  8. Stonehenge: How and why were the huge stones arranged in Stonehenge, England?
  9. Yeti (a.k.a. the Abominable Snowman): Does the Yeti monster really exist?
Research Focus Questions:
  1. What is the history of this phenomenon?
    • When and where has this happened? What happened?
    • Why is this phenomenon a mystery?
  2. What opinions do some people have about this phenomenon?
    • An opinion is someone's personal belief or way of thinking about a topic.
    • This includes beliefs and various personal experiences people have claim to have had.
    • Why do these people believe as they do?
  3. What theories about this phenomenon have experts, investigators or scientists proposed?
    • A theory is a possible explanation based on scientific or historical investigation and evidence.
    • What are some possible explanations for this phenomenon?
    • What evidence supports these theories?
  4. What facts have been proven about this phenomenon?
    • A fact is a statement that has been proven true.
    • What evidence supports these facts?
Lessons 11-15: Argumentative Writing
Follow an inquiry-based process to research a debatable current issue and compose a written argument to support your viewpoint on the issue.

Lesson 12:
Guide to selecting a topic *Your teacher will need to approve your topic selection.

Claim Support Resources:

Click on the Gather step above to continue your inquiry for Unit 1.

UNIT 2: Making Cultural Connections

PBA: Be a Museum Curator
Follow an inquiry-based process to research a culture and create a museum exhibit with artifacts that fully represent the culture.

It's time to make a choice about what country and culture you will focus your research on in order to create a museum exhibit with artifacts that represent that culture.

Complete Narrowing My Choices to identify your culture. You may choose any culture of your choice, with teacher approval.

Essential Questions:

  • How do texts reflect cultural beliefs and practices?
  • How does a reader make connections to text through a cultural lens?
Lessons 16-20: Become a Cultural Storyteller

Research the origin of a cultural item, custom, belief, or practice to compose a fictional piece featuring this cultural element.

It's time to make a choice about what cultural item, custom, belief, or practice you will focus your research on in order to create a fictional narrative that features this cultural element.

Use this cultural artifact selection sheet to identify which artifact you will focus your research on.

Essential Questions:

  • How do texts reflect cultural beliefs and practices?
  • How does an author use the narrative elements to convey cultural contexts?
  • How does a reader make connections to text through a cultural lens?

Click on the Gather step above to continue your inquiry for Unit 2.

UNIT 3: Making Scientific Connections

Lessons 15-18: Development of an Invention
Follow an inquiry-based process to research a scientific invention and create a group documentary explaining how the invention developed over time.

Essential Questions:

  • How does the organization of informational texts support a reader's understanding of new concepts?
  • How can technology both positively and negatively impact our world?
  • How does reading about science concepts help us understand the advancement of science?

Inquiry Question:

  • How has a scientifically-enhanced invention changed and developed over time?

Click on the Gather step above to continue your inquiry for Unit 3.

UNIT 4: Making Artistic Connections

Lessons: Traditional vs. Graphic
Compare and contrast traditional text forms with their graphic counterparts to determine the effectiveness of graphic text in communicating narrative elements. Use your written analysis to create a multimedia book review.

Based on your preview of some graphic novels during the EXPLORE step, identify 2-3 titles that you are interested in reading. Your teacher will approve your graphic novel choice..

Keep in mind the essential questions for this Unit as you continue your inquiry:

  • How is analyzing non-print text similar to/different from analyzing traditional text forms?
  • What choices do graphic artists make to effectively communicate their ideas to readers?

Use these inquiry questions to help you stay focused:

  • How are narrative elements like language, setting, plot, characters' emotions, and author's message developed in both versions of the story I am reading?
  • What resources, skills, and tools can I use to create a multimedia book review?
PBA: Graphic Novel Adaptation
Adapt an episode from a previously read narrative text into graphic novel form, and compose a reflection about the choices you made as a writer and artist.

From the list of stories you read in Units 1-3, identify the story you want to adapt into a graphic novel. Your teacher will approve your story selection.

Keep in mind the essential questions for this Unit as you continue your inquiry:

  • How is analyzing non-print text similar to/different from analyzing traditional text forms?
  • What choices do graphic artists make to effectively communicate their ideas to readers?

Use these inquiry questions to help you stay focused:

  • How can I apply what I have learned about graphic novels to my graphic adaptation of a narrative text?
  • What resources, skills, and tools can I use to create a graphic novel?

Click on the Gather step above to continue your inquiry for Unit 4.

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