Native to Maryland

Student Resources
Teacher Resources

open

  • Invitation to inquiry
  • Open minds
  • Stimulate curiosity


Image source: History Resource Center with subscription

Immerse

  • Build background knowledge
  • Connect to content
  • Discover interesting ideas
Icons from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

Background Knowledge

comprehension

Research Scenario

The Maryland Historical Society is planning a new virtual exhibit featuring the culture of Native Americans indigenous to the state. They are sponsoring a contest for student groups to create digital models for possible displays. These displays should highlight the relationship between the Native Americans' habitats and their lifestyles. Your class has decided to create a display for several Maryland Native American groups.

Essential Question: How did their natural habitats help to shape the political, economic, and social characteristics of Native American tribes in Maryland?

Throughout the research process, you will use a variety of inquiry tools and strategies.

First, use the resources below to build background knowledge, connect to the content, and discover interesting ideas.

  • Begin your Inquiry Journal by responding to these Inquiry Journal Prompts.
  • Engage in conversation in an Inquiry Circle to develop ideas and discuss emerging questions with a small group of classmates.

First, you will need to build some background knowledge about this topic.

Explore

  • Explore interesting ideas
  • Look around
  • Dip in
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.


Image source: History Resource Center with subscription

Task and Product

You will esearch a Native American tribe that was indigenous to Maryland. Your teacher will break the class into teams. Each group will research one of the following tribes:

  • Accohannock
  • Yaocomaco
  • Susquehannock
  • Shawnee
  • Nanticoke
  • Piscataway
  1. Your team will gather information about the political, economic, and social characteristics of your Native American tribe, as well as their habitat.
  2. As a group, you will then create a Voicethread which will serve as a virtual model for your museum display. Your teacher may decide to assign an alternate type of presentation from the following list:
    • Oral report: Audacity or a digital video recording device such as a Flip camera
    • Poster: Prezi or drawing software such as Pixie
    • Brochure: Microsoft Publisher or Word.

Explore

Use exploratory search strategies like browsing, scanning, and skimming a variety of resources. "Dip in" to read and reflect as you explore.

  • Use the Stop and Jot strategy to record ideas and questions in your Inquiry Journal.
  • Use the Pair-Share Protocol to clarify your ideas, get feedback, and gain insight.
  • Use the Inquiry Log to keep track of sources that might be useful for your inquiry.

 

evaluate

  • Evaluate the achievement of learning goals
  • Reflect on content
  • Reflect on process
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.


Image source: History Resource Center with subscription

Assessments

The following scoring tools may be used or adapted by you and your teacher to evaluate your research process and your final product and presentation. You can use these assessments throughout your inquiry process to plan, make decisions, monitor your progress, and self-assess your achievement of your inquiry-based learning goals.

Research Process Assessments:

Collaboration & Communication Assessments:

Final Product & Presentation Assessments:

Combined Process/Product Assessment:

 

You will be scored on the following components:

  • Notetaking Sheet: at least one completed by each team member
  • Voicethread: created collaboratively by all team members or alternative group presentation: given by all group members as a team
  • Voting Sheet: one by each individual team member

 

Identify

  • Pause and ponder
  • Decide direction
  • Identify inquiry question
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.


Image source:History Resource Center with subscription

Questions

Essential Question: How did their natural habitats help to shape the political, economic, and social characteristics of Native American tribes in Maryland?

Subsidiary Questions

  • Where was the Native American tribe located? What was their habitat like?
  • What are the social characteristics of the tribe?
    • Shelter?
    • Food?
    • Clothing?
    • Traditions?
    • Beliefs?
  • What are the political characteristics of the tribe?
    • Type of government?
    • Leadership roles?
    • Laws?
  • What are the economic characteristics of the tribe?
    • Types of currency?
    • Jobs?
    • Trade?

Consider a variety of questioning techniques as outlined in Jamie McKenzie's Questioning Toolkit. Refer to your Inquiry Journal for ideas and inspiration, and use these inquiry tools to help you identify an Essential Inquiry Question as you begin your inquiry:

 

 

gather

  • Gather important information
  • Go broad (search)
  • Go deep (read)
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

Image source: History Resource Center with subscription

Gather & Sort

Apply effective search strategies in order to locate and evaluate sources and digital content relevant to your information need.

 

 

Each member is required to complete one of the notetaking sheets for your Native American tribe. In addition, as a collaborative effort, each team member will contribute information about the habitat of your tribe to the Voicethread or alternative project.

 

Create

  • Reflect on learning
  • Go beyond facts to make meaning
  • Create to communicate
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.


Image source: History Resource Center by subscription

Create

Analyze your research notes to reflect on your learning. What new insights have emerged in response to your Essential Inquiry Question? Do you think you have enough information to answer the essential question?

Synthesize your findings by creating a product to communicate new meaning and understanding. Use the the steps in the Voicethread planning checklist to prepare your Voicethread.

Evaluate your research product and presentation according to the scoring criteria. Use the Voicethread or alternative project planning checklist to make sure you have completed all requirements. If you are missing any information, go back and use the resources to find the missing information and complete your Voicethread.

share

  • Learn from each other
  • Share your learning
  • Tell your story
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.


Image source: HIstory Resource Center with subscription

Share

Present your research findings to your inquiry community by creating a Voicethread, conducting an oral presentation, or participating in a "gallery walk" around several computers.

 

 

 

evaluate

  • Evaluate the achievement of learning goals
  • Reflect on content
  • Reflect on process
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

 

Image source: History Resource Center with subscription

Evaluate:

Evaluate the achievement of your inquiry-based learning goals using the scoring tools in the Assessments section, as directed by your teacher:
  • Reflect on your learning of the content by voting for the tribe which is best represented. Support your response with ideas and evidence from both your own research and your classmates' presentations.
  • Reflect on your inquiry process using Self Reflection on Inquiry.
  • Based on the information that you have either researched or have learned from your classmates, which tribe would you have wanted to be a part of? Remember to give specific details on how you decided and how the tribe you selected was different from the other tribes.


Extend your learning:

Many Americans think that Native Americans still dress, live, and eat like the Native American tribes the first explorers encountered. How would you help to dispel that stereotype?

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