The Awakening

Student Resources
French Quarter hotel

Teacher Resources

open

  • Invitation to inquiry
  • Open minds
  • Stimulate curiosity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Awakening book cover

Image source: Destiny Title Peek

Immerse

  • Build background knowledge
  • Connect to content
  • Discover interesting ideas
Icons from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

Background Knowledge

comprehension

 

the awakening

"The Awakening" image from Library of Congress Women's Suffrage Primary Source Collection.

Research Scenario

The Victorian Era got its name from Queen Victoria of England. During her reign many global changes were taking place including the Industrial Revolution and awakening of the awareness of social injustice. The era was known for its elegance and moral standards. Social reform blossomed during this period and was reflected in the literature of the time. The Awakening by Kate Chopin draws on the morals and expectations of the wealthy class of New Orleans and delves into the role of women.

Watch this video which parodies a popular music video about the role of women and the struggle for suffrage. As you watch the video think about how the images presented depict the struggles of women in turn-of-the-century America.

Also check out the video the publisher did on the making of this video which discusses the imagery and the historical detail and how it was blended into the music video.

How are changes in the role of women in American society at the turn of the century portrayed in Kate Chopin's The Awakening?

Throughout the research process, you will use a variety of inquiry tools and strategies.

First, use the resources below to build background knowledge, connect to the content, and discover interesting ideas.

  • Begin your Inquiry Journal by responding to these Inquiry Journal Prompts.
  • Engage in conversation in an Inquiry Circle to develop ideas and discuss emerging questions with a small group of classmates. Use your skimming and scanning skills to solidify your background knowledge of these topics. A solid basis in the background will help you focus your later research.

Women in Victorian Society

New Orleans and the French Quarter

Grand Isle, Louisiana and the Hurricane of 1893

Explore

  • Explore interesting ideas
  • Look around
  • Dip in
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

fleur de lis

Image Source: Clipart.com

Task and Product

You will develop a three-phase argumentative essay based on your research which answers the essential question:

How are changes in the role of women in American society at the turn of the century portrayed in Kate Chopin's The Awakening?

 

Explore

Think about the background knowledge you gained earlier. How will you use this to focus your research?

Use exploratory search strategies like browsing, scanning, and skimming a variety of resources. "Dip in" to read and reflect as you explore.

  • Use the Stop and Jot strategy to record ideas and questions in your Inquiry Journal.
  • Use the Pair-Share Protocol to clarify your ideas, get feedback, and gain insight.
  • Use the Inquiry Log to keep track of sources that might be useful for your inquiry.

evaluate

  • Evaluate the achievement of learning goals
  • Reflect on content
  • Reflect on process
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

Assessments

The following scoring tools may be used or adapted by your teacher to evaluate your research process and your final product.

Research Process Assessments:

Collaboration & Communication Assessments:

Final Product & Presentation Assessments:

Combined Process/Product Assessment:

Identify

  • Pause and ponder
  • Decide direction
  • Identify inquiry question
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.


 

Questions

Overarching Question:

How are changes in the role of women in American society at the turn of the century portrayed in Kate Chopin's The Awakening?

Essential Inquiry Question:

Consider a variety of questioning techniques as outlined in Jamie McKenzie's Questioning Toolkit. Refer to your Inquiry Journal for ideas and inspiration, and use these inquiry tools to help you identify an Essential Inquiry Question as you begin your inquiry:

You may then need to generate some subsidiary questions that would help you to gather some specific information relevant to your Essential Inquiry Question. Record the questions you generate on your Chart to Decide and Chart to Identify. Use these questions to help focus your research. Use what you learned in your search for background knowledge earlier to help generate questions to guide your research.

gather

  • Gather important information
  • Go broad (search)
  • Go deep (read)
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.
fleur de lis

Image source: Clipart.com

Gather & Sort

Apply effective search strategies in order to locate and evaluate sources and digital content relevant to your information need.

  • Read deeply from pertinent resources and apply reading strategies to construct meaning.
  • Use the Inquiry Log to make choices and track your inquiry journey.
  • Use strategies and tools for note-taking, documentation, and reflection as you gather:
    • Use the Gather Inquiry Journal: Go Deep to help you write about important ideas you find and reflect on what you have learned from your reading.
    • Consider using a Web 2.0 note-taking tool to collect and sort information: (These require accounts.)
  • Refine your inquiry question or focus as needed, based on your research findings so far and your new insights and understandings.
  • Demonstrate digital citizenship and avoid plagiarism by paraphrasing or quoting information, and by citing your sources in a Works Cited list.
    • Avoiding Plagiarism - from Purdue OWL, this resource takes the user through the topic using a series of slide-like pages.
    • Cut and Paste: Internet Plagiarism - NBC Learn video -Growing number of students are involved in Internet cheating: cutting and pasting writing they find online into their own papers. Now, educators are using Internet programs to detect plagiarism and identify cheaters.
    • The Writing Place - from Northwestern University

Create

  • Reflect on learning
  • Go beyond facts to make meaning
  • Create to communicate
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

Kate Chopin House

Image source: Kate Chopin's New Orleans house from KateChopin.org

 

 

<New Orleans French Quarter

Image source: Clipart.com

Create

Recall that as part of your argumentative essay, you must include examples from "The Awakening", the background knowledge you gained, and your research.

Refresh your knowledge on the Argumentative Essay with some of the tools below. Many are directed toward the AP Language Exam but the techniques are the same.

Analyze your research notes to reflect on your learning. What new insights have emerged in response to your Essential Inquiry Question? Use the IPL2 Research & Writing Step by Step Guide section on Preparing to write for some tips.

Examine what you learned from your background exploration and from your research

  • Do you have enough evidence to support a position?
  • Have you found examples from your background exploration and your research?
  • Can you refute any potential opposite views?

Synthesize your findings by creating a product to communicate new meaning and understanding. Use the IPL2 Research & Writing Step by Step Guide section on writing your paper for tips.

  • Compose your main idea or thesis statement.
  • Outline your arguments using examples.
  • Be sure to cover any opposing viewpoints.
  • Close your essay with a coherent conclusion.
  • Be sure to proof-read.

Evaluate your research product according to the scoring criteria. Review the process suggested by Purdue OWL for proofreading and revising your writing.

  • Are my mechanics correct? (grammar, spelling)
  • Have I met all the criteria from the rubric?
  • Have I supported my position with examples?
  • Have I refuted opposing arguments?
  • Have I referred back to my opening with my conclusion?

share

  • Learn from each other
  • Share your learning
  • Tell your story
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

Share

Present your research findings to your inquiry community by turning in your completed essay to your teacher. Your teacher may also require a presentation of some sort or conduct a classroom discussion.

Your essay should meet the requirements set forth by your teacher in the scoring rubric. This is your vehicle to share the new knowledge you have gained from your research.

In a class discussion, remember to use the same strategies in your responses:

  • be concise in stating your position
  • support your position with concrete examples
  • respectfully refute others' viewpoints

 

 

evaluate

  • Evaluate the achievement of learning goals
  • Reflect on content
  • Reflect on process
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

 

Map of Grand Isle

I813 map of Grand Isle
Image source: GrandIsle.us

Evaluate

Evaluate the achievement of your inquiry-based learning goals using the scoring tools in the Assessments section, as directed by your teacher:

  • Reflect on your learning of the content by writing a response in a class blog. Support your response with ideas and evidence from both your own research and the class discussion.

Overarching Question:

How are changes in the role of women in American society at the turn of the century portrayed in Kate Chopin's The Awakening?


Extend your learning:

In the book, Edna chooses suicide as a resolution. If you could rewrite the ending of the novel, how would you resolve Edna's situation in another way? Why do you think she choose this resolution?

Create an Animoto, Glog, or other project as directed by your teacher which depicts your alternate ending.

OR

Create a PSA (Public Service Announcement) to inform about suicide. Use examples from the book to demonstrate why Edna was at risk and who might have intervened to prevent her suicide. This may done collaboratively in small groups.

Use these resources to help:

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