Happy Habitats

Student Resources

mountain range

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Teacher Resources

open

  • Invitation to inquiry
  • Open minds
  • Stimulate curiosity

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Immerse

  • Build background knowledge
  • Connect to content
  • Discover interesting ideas
Icons from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

Research Scenario

Have you ever been to the Baltimore Zoo? Did you know that there are people who work and volunteer at the zoo to take care of the animals and to make sure the animals stay healthy?

The Baltimore Zoo wants to open four new exhibits. Each exhibit will feature a new animal: a cardinal, a camel, a red-eyed tree frog, and a polar bear.

To make sure each animal survives and is happy in their new home at the zoo, the zoo needs to create an exhibit that is just like each animals' habitat in the wild.

Can you and your classmates research habitats from around the world as well each animal to help The Baltimore Zoo create the perfect home for a cardinal, a camel, a red-eyed tree frog, and a polar bear?

Essential Question:
How does an animal's habitat affect its survival?

Throughout the research process, you will use a variety of inquiry tools and strategies.

Let's build some background knowledge about habitats to complete this KWL chart.

First, view What are Habitats? to learn about habitats. Then, use the World Book Kids or World Book Student database to gather and record some more information.
  • Search on the keyword habitat.

 

Choose one prompt to complete each day: Inquiry Journal Prompts

 

Explore

  • Explore interesting ideas
  • Look around
  • Dip in
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

 

 


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Task and Product

1. You will learn about the arctic, desert, rain forest, and woodland forest habitats.

2. You will research a cardinal, a camel, a polar bear, or a red eyed-tree frog with a small group of classmates.

3. You will study the information you have gathered on the four habitats and your specific animal to determine which living environment would be the most appropriate home for your animal.

4. Combine what you have learned about habitats and your animal to create a model of your animal in its habitat.. The zoo will use this information to create each animals' exhibit.

 

Explore

Use exploratory search strategies like browsing, scanning, and skimming a variety of resources. "Dip in" to read and reflect as you explore.

  • Use the Stop and Jot strategy to record ideas and questions in your Inquiry Journal.
  • Use the Pair-Share Protocol to clarify your ideas, get feedback, and gain insight.
  • Use the Inquiry Log to keep track of sources that might be useful for your inquiry.

Remember to use your own words. Don't just copy and paste your notes. Keep track of which sources you use to gather information. Your teacher will give you directions about how to list the sources you used.

To figure out which animal belongs in each habitat, we need to learn about arctic, desert, rain forest, and woodland forest habitats.

Check out Student Resources to help you learn about different habitats from around the world. As you are working, fill out this graphic organizer.

Don't forget to go back to your KWL Chart to fill out the "Learned" section about habitats.

evaluate

  • Evaluate the achievement of learning goals
  • Reflect on content
  • Reflect on process
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

 


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Assessments

The following scoring tools may be used or adapted by you and your teacher to evaluate your research process and your final product and presentation. You can use these assessments throughout your inquiry process to plan, make decisions, monitor your progress, and self-assess your achievement of your inquiry-based learning goals.

Research Process Assessments:
  • Click here to see a rubric on how you will be graded for class participation and teamwork
  • Daily (Formative) Assessments
  • Summative Assessments:

Collaboration & Communication Assessments:

Final Product & Presentation Assessments

Combined Process/Product Assessment:

Identify

  • Pause and ponder
  • Decide direction
  • Identify inquiry question
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

Questions

Essential Question:

How does an animal’s habitat affect its survival?

Look back at your habitat graphic organizer and your animal web

Let's Revisit and Extend:

  • What is a habitat?
  • What is an ecosystem? Watch a video and find out!!
  • What is an environment?
  • What are some characteristics of a desert, rain forest, woodland forest, and the arctic?
  • How do animals depend on plants and other forms of life for survival?
  • Could an animal survive in a habitat that is not its own?
  • Do you have other questions about habitats or your animal?

gather

  • Gather important information
  • Go broad (search)
  • Go deep (read)
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

Gather & Sort

Check out Student Resources

  • Apply reading strategies as you visit different resources.
  • Use the Inquiry Log to make choices and track your inquiry journey.
  • Use strategies and tools for note-taking, documentation, and reflection as you gather:

Your teacher will assign you an animal to research in a small group. With your group, research the animal and complete your own animal web on Kidspiration using either pictures or words.

Use these Student Resources to gather and sort information about your assigned animal.

Create

  • Reflect on learning
  • Go beyond facts to make meaning
  • Create to communicate
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

 

 

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Create

Analyze

Look through your research notes to reflect on your learning:

-What have you learned?

-Do you know enough about arctic, desert, rain forest, woodland forest habitats?

- Do you have enough information about your animal?

-Should you go back and learn more?

 

Synthesize

Put together your findings for The Baltimore Zoo:

Use what you have learned to create a diorama showing your animal in its appropriate habitat. Include samples of living and non-living things that might be found in your animal's habitat.

Click here for directions and to view some sample dioramas.

 

Evaluate your diorama according to the checklist.

Use what you have learned to answer the question:

How does an animal’s habitat affect its survival?

share

  • Learn from each other
  • Share your learning
  • Tell your story
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

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Share

Presentation:

  • Present your diorama to your teacher and class, explaining the details of what you included in your habitat and how they might help your animal survive.

 

  • Do a gallery walk to the other groups to check out their dioramas in more detail and decide whether they chose the correct habitats for their animal.

 

  • Fill out this form for each group as you walk around.

 

 

evaluate

  • Evaluate the achievement of learning goals
  • Reflect on content
  • Reflect on process
Icon from Kuhlthau, C.C., Maniotes, L.K.,  & Caspari, A.K. (2012).  Guided inquiry design: A framework for inquiry in your school. Santa Barbara, CA:  Libraries Unlimited.

 

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Evaluate:

The following scoring tools may be used or adapted by your Supervisor (teacher) to evaluate your research process and your final product and presentation.

Evaluate the achievement of your inquiry-based learning goals using the scoring tools in the Assessments section, as directed by your teacher:
  • Reflect on your learning of the content by writing a response to the Overarching Question; support your response with ideas and evidence from both your own research and your classmates' presentations.
  • Reflect on your inquiry process using Self Reflection on Inquiry.


Extend your learning:

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